EQ Acoustics

ACOUSTIC FOAM SOUND ABSORBERS


DOES YOUR ROOM AFFECT THE QUALITY OF YOUR AUDIO?

Acoustic Foam is a popular sound absorption material for home users. Being soft and porous, acoustic foam reduces the energy of sound waves as they pass through its cell-like structure.

Placing acoustic foam on your walls or ceiling will reduce the reverberation (echoes) in your room making it more suitable for audio work including music production, voiceover and podcasting.

Acoustic foam products offer effective mid to high frequency sound absorption and a low-cost alternative to more sophisticated treatments such as fabric wrapped polyester fibre panels and bass traps.

The Acoustic Foam product range includes everything from Classic Wedge Tiles to mic-stand mounted FreeSpace absorbers and combines quality acoustic foams with elegant product designs.

ACOUSTIC TREATMENT IS THE FASTEST ROUTE TO SIGNIFICANTLY UPGRADING YoUR STUDIO, OFFERING BETTER SOUND QUALITY AND MORE PROFESSIONAL RESULTS FROM YOUR EXISTING EQUIPMENT.
Acoustic foam sound absorbers

ACOUSTIC FOAM SOUND ABSORBERS

  • Get rid of unwanted echo and reverberation noise
  • Give the sound of your speakers a BIG upgrade
  • Capture pro-sounding vocal and instrument recordings
  • Get clearer audio on your videos and podcasts
  • Make your room quieter and calmer helping you to concentrate

FAQs

1 - Can I soundproof my room with acoustic foam?

No – foam is for acoustic treatment. It can play a role in specific soundproofing projects but soundproofing is mainly about adding mass (normally extra plasterboard).

2 - How much foam do I need?

It depends on the room’s size and purpose. As a rough guide small rooms (6-12 SQM floor area) require around 2-4 SQM of foam and larger rooms (12-20 SQM floor area) require 5-8 SQM of foam.

3 - Where should I put my acoustic foam tiles?

It depends on the room’s purpose and layout. Check out the acoustic treatment guide in our resources section or head over to our Facebook group for some tailored advice.

4 - Can acoustic foam treat bass?

In principle yes but in practice to absorb below 50Hz you would need very large foam traps. Polyester fibre bass traps are better value and more effective than foam.

Let us do what we do best by sending us an email or heading over to our Facebook group for some friendly and helpful advice.

CASE STUDIES

YORK HOUSE STUDIOS

WARP RECORDS

Contact us FOR FURTHER ADVICE FOR YOUR STUDIO!